Looking for a used or new machine tool?
1,000s to choose from
Machinery-Locator
TDT Machine Tools MPU XYZ Machine Tools MPU Hurco MPU Bodor MPU Ceratizit MPU

Machinery-Locator
The online search from the pages of Machinery Market.

MORI SEIKI NV 7000/50
Control MSX-504 MAPPS - IV

Technical data:
Movements:
 X-axis:	1540 mm
 Y axis:	760 mm
 Z axi
Control MSX-504 MAPPS - IV Technical data: Movements: X-axis: 1540 mm Y axis: 760 mm Z axi...
S. H. Vaerktojsmaskiner

Be seen in all the right places!

Intermach 2020 Toolex 2020 MTA Hanoi ITM Industry Europe 2020 Advanced Engineering 2020 Metaltech 2020 Manufacturing & Supply Chain Expo Machine Tool Indonesia 2020 MACH 2021 FITMA 2021

Aerojet Rocketdyne teams up with NASA

Posted on 29 Oct 2019 and read 717 times
Aerojet Rocketdyne teams up with NASAAerojet Rocketdyne has entered into a ‘Space Act Agreement’ with NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center to design
and manufacture a lightweight rocket-engine thrust-chamber assembly using additive-manufacturing processes and
materials.

The goal of the project is to reduce manufacturing costs and make a thrust chamber that is easily scalable to support a variety of missions — including America’s return to the Moon and subsequent missions to explore Mars.

Aerojet Rocketdyne (www.aerojetrocketdyne.com) will use a combination of 3-D printing technologies — including solid-state deposition and laser deposition — for the rapid fabrication of complex components.

The company says the ‘vertical integration’ of these robotic additive-manufacturing techniques is expected to yield ‘a scalable design’ that could be applied to propulsion systems ranging from small systems that would support a lunar lander, all the way up to large boosters that enable launch vehicles to escape Earth’s gravity.

Aerojet Rocketdyne CEO and president Eileen Drake (pictured), said: “As we look to the future of space exploration, efficiency and scalability will be key, which is why we are excited to work with NASA on this innovative thrust chamber for rocket engines.

“The technology we develop will leverage the most advanced additive-manufacturing techniques and materials to help provide efficient and safe transportation to and through space.”